Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Eight-Year-Old ‘Hacker’ Unlocks Dad’s iPhone After iOS 14.5 Update

Unlocking an iPhone with an Apple Watch can pose a security risk to the user

Eight-Year-Old ‘Hacker’ Unlocks Dad’s iPhone After iOS 14.5 Update

Apple released its iOS 14.5 this week, which has been tested over the past several months.

The new version of the “apple” operating system received several new and useful innovations, including updated privacy rules for applications in the App Store, as well as the function of unlocking the iPhone with an Apple Watch, which allows you to unlock your smartphone while wearing a face shield. But, as it turned out, the functionality can pose a risk to the user’s security and privacy.

ESET technician Jake Moore discovered the problem when he asked his eight-year-old daughter to test the reliability of the function. The girl put on the mask and immediately got access to Dad’s iPhone by simply swiping up the screen.

“I received a notification on my watch that it [the smartphone – ed.] Was unlocked, I had the option to lock the phone, but it’s easy to miss, which gives attackers another tool to exploit,” Moore explained.

Eight-Year-Old ‘Hacker’ Unlocks Dad’s iPhone After iOS 14.5 Update

Forbes journalist Davey Winder ran his own experiment and found the same problem. As specified on the Apple support site, “the function does not use Face ID for recognition and authentication” and when activated, unlocking will occur when it detects “any masked face when the watch is unlocked and nearby.”

Of course, Apple has taken care of various security mechanisms, such as passwords, wrist recognition or unlock notifications coming to Apple Watch. However, Winder notes, the vibration on the notification does not always work and is easy to overlook.

“The battle between convenience and security is a protracted battle between users and the information security industry. Allowing users to open someone else’s device is a serious security blow and should only be used if absolutely necessary and if it poses less risk than entering a password in a public place, ”said Jake Moore.

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